Food for Thought Film Series

The Food for Thought Film Series is designed to offer education through entertainment. We bring both documentaries and feature films to town on a number of issues related to the Co-op’s mission. Films are shown at the Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre in downtown Moscow February - April and September - November with occasional additional screenings. We are excited to share that we have partnered with the University of Idaho Sustainability Center to make every film free for everyone! In addition, we may partner with additional community organizations and businesses that share interests in the subject matter of a particular film.

October's Film is Food For Change

WHEN?: WEDNESDAY, OctoBER 17, AT 7 P.M.(DOORS AT 6:30)
WHERE?: THE KENWORTHY PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE (508 S. MAIN STREET)
HOW MUCH?: FREE TO ALL (SO BRING A FRIEND!)

This provocative film looks at the current resurgence of food co-operatives in America, and their unique historic place in America’s economic and political landscape—somewhere between Adam Smith & Eugene Debs.

Food For Change, a feature-length (84 min.) documentary from Home Planet Pictures, tells the story of the co-op movement in the U.S. through a combination of interviews, rare archival footage, and commentary by co-op leaders and historians.

The film examines the key role played by consumer-led food co-ops during the decades-long debate over profit-driven capitalism vs. locally-controlled economic enterprises. Born in the heartland, cooperatives were seen as the middle path between Wall Street and Socialism.

Filmmaker Steve Alves describes his documentary as “one part food, to two parts politics, to three parts economics.” Alves tracks the co-op movement’s quest for whole and organic foods, and the dream of sustainable food systems. The film profiles several current food

co-ops that have revived neighborhoods and entire communities---right in the shadow of corporate agribusiness and national supermarket chain stores.  

“Today we’re experiencing a renaissance of American food co-ops,” says Sean Doyle, General Manager of the Seward Co-op. “These are not marginal enterprises—they are successful and dynamic businesses that are revitalizing communities across the United States. People are once again taking more control over the economic forces in their lives.”